History

Seth Bullock

 

Late 1800 photo of Seth Bullock with his business partner, Sol Star and an unidentified man on a bridge over the Redwater River, in or near Belle Fourche. Bullock owned the land upon which this office is built until December 30, 1889, just a few months after statehood was granted to South Dakota. Photo courtesy of the Adams Museum & House, Inc., Deadwood, South Dakota.

 

Cade & Overpeck Land and Abstract Company

 

October 1903 photo of the founders of the Cade & Overpeck Land and Abstract Company in this office building. Tyler S. Overpeck (left) and Emmett A. Cade (right) specialized in helping homesteaders “prove up” their claims during the early 1900s. The safe behind Mr. Cade remains in the front of our office building.

 

VVV Ranch cowboys

 

Photograph of VVV Ranch cowboys taken in front of this office in 1906. The VVV Ranch gained notoriety when Henry Longabaugh stole a horse from the ranch in 1887. After incarceration for this offense in Sundance, Wyoming, Mr. Longabaugh became known as The Sundance Kid. In 1908, two years after this photo, Dan McCutchen started practicing law in this building. A law firm has been in this building ever since.

 

Dan McCutchen

 

Early 1900s photo of Dan McCutchen in his “old office” at the Hampton Hotel. The Hampton was located on the lot currently occupied by Wells Fargo Bank. The chest of drawers behind Dan is still used today in our office building.

 

 

THE WORKING LAWYER

You are the object of fear and respect
You are the butt of jokes.
You are the working lawyer.
You can act with surpassing nobility; you can do what has to be done.

You can raise fundamental issues of constitutional law, you can fuss over matters so seemingly trivial that your adversary screams in frustration.

You live a life of furious action: impossible deadlines, contentious negotiations, courtroom confrontations. You live a life, also, of bookish research and quiet meditation.

You are conversant not only with the law, but with all the world's knowledge and experience. You can speak knowledgeably with neurosurgeons; you understand the dynamics of a barroom brawl.

 

One day, overwhelmed by setbacks, you curse the day you entered law school; the next day, a favorable verdict or ruling intoxicates you into thinking, once again, the the life of the working lawyer is the sweetest in the world.

 

To your clients, you are a knight in shining armor, to adversaries, an unscrupulous pettifogger.
You are the working lawyer.
You love it.
You hate it.
And, when all is said and done, you can't think of anything else you'd rather be.